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tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight a conversation about haiti's with the noted author, amy wilentz. her latest focuses on the caribbean nation and is called "farewell, fred voodoo." it looks that he be's efforts to rebuild after the earthquake and seeks to debunk who -- it looks at haiti's efforts to rebuild after the earthquake. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. pbs station from viewers like thank you. tavis: jamie williams is a noted author. she is -- amy wilentz is a noted author. her latest revisits the nation of haiti. it is called "farewell, fred voodoo." we should start by talking about the title. >> friend voodoo is a name the international press corps used to name for the haitian on the street. what i would like to say is they are trained to go deeper than that and not just have a stereotypical view of haitians
picked out -- these are actually delivered to haiti after the earthquake by the u.s. military. it's called fiji water for a reason to it comes from fiji which is coming, caribbean geography, not in the caribbean. and it was said that quite a lot of expensive by a lot of effort. it was a very beautiful project for photographers to take pictures of these gleaming pallets of bottled water coming off these planes with the concept being that there was this incredible water crisis, incredible food crisis. the way was often reported that he did was press on the verge of a family. there were real problems and you know, there certainly needed to be a response, but this is an example of response that is just not very well thought out. it was a very nice gesture on behalf of the fiji water company. it was a lovely gesture but it was sort of ridiculous because they actually do have water in haiti. it is an island, much like fiji, and what really needed to be done is how the water be purified come clean up and be distributed better. existing water in haiti to be improved. and, frankly, long be
exquisitely coordinated. >> now jonathancast, katz, who lived in haiti, talks about the work to rebuild the country. it's 45 minutes. >> hello. thank you for the introduction. this is very cool. this is my first book, so if i look like i'm really not accustomed to this, it's because i'm really not accustomed to this. so the book is called "the big truck that went by." and there's a spoiler in the subtitle. how the world came to save haiti and left behind a disaster, i'm going to read to you a little bit about it and talk about it, and then i hope that we have a good discussion as this topic usually provokes. so i'm going to start by reading from chapter one, the end. before i do i'm going to give myself some water. this brand of water is in the book. had i known that i would have picked that section. i can try to look for it in a little bit. these are actually delivered to haiti after the earthquake by the u.s. military. it's called fiji water for a reason. it comes from fiji, which is not in the caribbean, and it was sent at quite a lot of expense and quite a lot of effort. it was a ve
actually delivered to haiti after the earthquake by the u.s. military. it's called fiji water for a reason. it comes from fiji which is, you know, caribbean geography, not in the caribbean. and it was sent at quite a lot of expense and quite a lot of effort. it was a very beautiful project for photographers to take pictures of these gleaming pallets of bottled water coming off these planes with the concept been that there was this incredible water crisis, incredible food crisis. the way it was often reported was haiti was on perhaps the verge of a famine following the earthquake. and there were real problems, then and you know, they're certainly needed to be a response, but this is an example of a response that was not very well thought out. it was a grenades just on behalf of the fiji water company. it was a lovely gesture, but it was sort of ridiculous because they actually do have water in haiti. it is an island, much like fiji, and what really need to be done was for the water to be purified and cleaned up and the existing system of water in system to be improved. and franklin long bef
at what we did as a country to haiti, to thomas jefferson did everything he could to defeat the haitian revolution. the only successful slave revolt in the history of the hemisphere if these people turned back an army from spain, armies of 60,000 apiece from england and france twice and won their freedom, opened their doors to freeing slaves all over the world, gave them a weapon and muskets and soldiers to fight for freedom and black america in exchange for freeing slaves there, a promise he didn't keep but they did all of these things and america did everything they could to quash this haitian quest for freedom for people who had been enslaved. and when they won their revolution, they took with it two-thirds of france's foreign income because that was the most valuable colony in the world. now, that survives even until now. frederick douglass spoke at the ship cargo world's fair in 1893 and mystified about how hostile the united states has always been towards haiti, hostile towards them because they won their freedom. we did everything we could to overthrow the democratically-elected
where no one thought there was any reason for hope. >> the idea that because you're born in haiti, you could die having a child. the idea that because you're born in, you know, malawi, your children may go to bed hungry. we want to take some of the chance out of that. >> dr. farmer invited us to central haiti where he discovered his life's work more than 25 years ago. that meant a three-hour, jaw-clenching, teeth-rattling ride on an unpaved road from the capital city to the hospital. >> why do they call this a highway? >> you got me. you got me, buddy. it's the principle artery through central haiti. >> if the ride doesn't break your back, what you see when you arrive will break your heart. the squatter settlement of cange is one of the poorest parts of the poorest country in the western hemisphere. >> [speaking french] >> the desperate need paul farmer saw here as a young man inspired him and four friends to create partners in health. they raised money and built what's become the largest hospital in central haiti. >> [speaking french] >> how many lives do you think partners in health
haiti helping out a long ways from home. really? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms, plus it relieves your runny nose. [ breathes deeply ] awesome. [ male announcer ] yes, it is. that's the cold truth! if you're living with moderate to severe crohn's disease, and it feels like your life revolves around your symptoms, ask your gastroenterologist about humira adalimumab. humira has been proven to work for adults who have tried other medications but still experience the symptoms of moderate to severe crohn's disease. in clinical studies, the majority of patients on humira saw significant symptom relief and many achieved remission. humira can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious, sometimes fatal events, such as infections, lymphoma or other types of cancer have happened. blood, liver and nervous system problems, serious allergic reactions and new or worsening heart failure have occurred. before starting humira, your doctor should test you for tb. ask your doctor if you live in or have been to a region where certa
practical to test your theory. is there a lab practical to test this theory? haiti. as you know, a few years ago the haitian people suffered an earthquake and the initial problem was crush injuries. yes, infection and dysentery and water supply and all those things would follow fairly soon, but the initial catastrophe was crush injuries, trauma, and the hospitals were gone. so what did we do? the world responded as best it could. what we did, the naval maritime forces, we sent our balts group down there which was patroling the area, we sent the hospital ship comfort down. so you have the comfort on the east coast, you have the mercy on the west coast. the mercy is parked down in san diego. it just got back from its asian humanitarian assistance from guam, indonesia, vietnam, an amazing number of nations we're partnering with. those hospital ships with 1,000 beds, 12 operating rooms, they produce their own medical oxygen, they have ct scanners and they can do almost anything a hospital on the west coast can do and we can park them offshore as we did in haiti and in haiti they spent
of the year. the nine nations refuse to pay compensation to victims of cholera in haiti despite claims it is at fault for an epidemic that claimed nearly a thousand lives. the cholera outbreak that sickened roughly 620,000 haitians has been linked to u.n. peacekeepers who responded to haiti's devastating 2010 earthquake. but the u.n. says it will not pay hundreds of names of dollars sought by thousands of victims and family members. the u.n. spokesperson made the announcement thursday. >> in november 2011, a claim for compensation was brought against the united nations on behalf of victims of the cholera outbreak in haiti. to date, the united nations advised the clemens representatives that the claims are not receivable, pursuant to section 29 of the convention and the privileges and immunities of the united nations. the secretary general again expresses its profound sympathy for the terrible suffering caused by the cholera epidemic and calls on partners in haiti and the international community to work together to ensure better health and a better future for the people of haiti. >> the
thousands of compensation claims for deaths caused by the cholera outbreak in haiti. lawyers say it was caused by u.n. peacekeepers. our diplomatic editor reports from new york. >> for more than two years, the men had been investigating claims that their own peacekeepers started a cholera epidemic that has killed almost 8000 people and infected one in 16 haitians. the scientists have examined the case and they believe the evidence is overwhelming. these pictures show the camp where nepalese soldiers were based and sewage contaminated river. the man has never admitted that they are to blame and they have never apologized. in a bureaucratically worded statement, they say they will not pay compensation claims which amount to hundreds of millions of dollars. totoday, the united nations advise the claimants' representatives that the claims are not receivable pursuant to section 29 of the convention and privileges and immunities of the united nations. >> we have come down to discover what that means. this is the revolution. and never accepted responsibility for the cholera outbreak. wh
independent studies have found strong evidence that peace keepers brought cholera to haiti, the united nations has never accept it had results. but in december of last year it pledged $2.2 billion to help fight and eradicate the disease. >> the u.n. is playing a double game. on the one hand they are providing assistance for alleviating the epidemic but on the other hand they refuse to accept the responsibility. >> the haitian government has remained largely silent on the issue. outraging victims and health groups. and over half a million people fell ill because of the cholera epidemic which began right here. but medical experts say haiti still isn't out of the woods yet. >> at the nearby cholera clinic, doctors visit their youngest patients all of them only a few months old and already sick. at the beginning of the outbreak this doctor saw thousands of cholera victims. though the numbers of patients has dwindled he still worries. for many patients, like this man who lost his five-year-old daughter to cholera, the united nations has overstayed its welcome. >> people even might even rise up agai
, haiti, and south africa and helping out in areas just as the tsunami in south east asia and the earthquake and tsunami in japan and last year, and during hurricane katrina we tributed one mill object pounds of food aid. [ applause ] >> and all of that is coming from the lgbt and friends community. so we work as ambassadors for our community and we help change people's minds and hearts about who we are and what we care about. besides providing humanitarian aid, we try to inspire hope in all of our projects and we have found that hope is really just as important as aid, if not more so. and we have worked with a lot of communities in desperate situations arounded world and we found that providing a little bit of humanitarian aid and a lot of courage and hope it is amazing that people in desperate circumstances can do to improve theirs life. so seven years ago we really have a feeling that in the united states, we really need to increase our hope also. and we decided to do that by creating a global art project, the world, tree of hope. and what you see behind you is a live,
personal family's history. my family is from haiti. he was occupied by the u.s. -- haiti was occupied by the u.s. my great, great uncle was part of the resistance movement tried to fight the u.s. marines occupying haiti, and he died trying to protect the freedom of haiti. my personal research actually is [indiscernible] surely before finding out about this, i was reading up on u.s. support of the financial support, logistical support of the regime and helping to keep him and placed third he was a brutal dictatorship that killed tens of thousands of people. just helpingwe're to improve whether it is to interviewing techniques -- there's no way to control what are the alternate bowles that these techniques -- ultimate goals that these techniques will be used examples are fabricated weapons of mass destruction, and so i think there is really a cause for concern in terms of what this represents and in terms of whether university can really align itself with u.s. foreign policy in such a way. there's also issues in terms of -- i think it is impossible to control how this is used, but the l
or in the libya or in tahrir square or when there is an earthquake in haiti or a reactor in japan now, they did not look to brazil or india. a look to the united states. the economic crisis we are undergoing should in no way inhibit us from proceeding with a strategic debate that we have to have. history does not allow us either zero sums or time outs. it is never a zero sum between domestic and foreign policy. we always have to proceed within our borders and outside. there are no zero sums or time aus for the united states when we can call a timeout and tell the world to pause while we get our economic situation back in order. the sooner we understand that what we are debating is a moral, historical, and strategic question and not an economic or budgetary question, the budget can be cut 100 different ways and the defense budget can become 100 different ways, or not at all. this whole element of the conversation has to be retired. there are crises that involve our values but not our interests. there are crises that of all our interest and on our bellies. there are crises that of all of both. ob
century he took on a variety of mission in haiti and the philippines, nicaragua and just before world war ii, they started creating amphibious landing forces. mandy mickens defended islands. >> host: what was the marines corps' reputation throughout much of the history? >> guest: not very good. ever thinks about the marine corps today is the most procedures were the to the major services and that's been validated by numerous polls over the last 12 years routinely the most american people say. it wasn't that way at the start of world war ii. was that of the spanish government to be rough and rowdy. parents are meant to be the least desirable associates and they were the least popular service in a nationwide study. is pretty similar to that. these are big thuggish guys in the neighborhood might then, i didn't like dominica have problems getting qualities and since the beginning until world war ii. >> host: what happened? desk or a couple things change. the most important is world war ii. once the marines can initial payment is start of the war until christmas day against repeated japanese a
ends with iran haiti does? >> host: you write in "the thistle and the drone" of the survey of american and afghan soldiers this is how they view the americans americans, they always shout and yell and they are crazy and u.s. soldiers swear at us constantly it saying a few they do not care about civilian casualties, they p all over right in front of civilians including females. >>. >> guest: this is what the americans thought of the afghan forces there turds we're better off without them i don't trust the locals they could be sleepers of whatever like to it meant iraqis are smarter but there einstein compared to afghan they only seem to care about their own tribe. >> guest: there right. that a survey gives us an insight into routes to allies who are working together soldier -- shoulder and shoulder with obvious contempt because after a decade those who have invested billions of dollars so the troops would take over. if this is what they're thinking of what is the legacy of leaving behind? >> to the afghan understand why they're in their country? >> no. that parted the world including pa
's home. he was a decorated corporal deployed to iraq in 2007 and haiti in 2010. he is currently on suicide watch in custody. >>> day six of an ongoing hostage situation in midland, alabama. investigators continue to work with accused captor jimmy lee dykes hiding out in an underground bunker with a 5- year-old boy with medical needs. he is wanted for killing the boy's bus driver and taking the boy hostage. dykes has been working with investigators getting the boy medicine, toys and food. >> we don't know why if we're ever faced with this as a community as a whole. >>> the edge on d.c. now, police looking for the person who stabbed a man to his death inside his northwest apartment. a relative found howard venable jr. unresponsive in his home on fuller street saturday. neighbors say the 68-year-old lived in this building for over 15 years, first with his wife and recently taking care of his young granddaughter. neighbors are surprised by the recent events. >> he was a good guy, looked out for the kids, treat us good. that was it. >> he was quoted recently in the apartment's newsle
, like 11 news saw firsthand in january 2010 when comfort was deployed to haiti after a zero. -- a 7.0 earthquake struck. it also serves in humanitarian missions, providing medical care around the caribbean and south america. the question is why does it need to leave baltimore? officials say there are a number of reasons. >> it puts it closer to the ocean, closer to the nations and regions that it does provide humanitarian support for. it is also co-located with medical treatment personnel. it is also a cost saving initiative for the navy and the taxpayer. >> after its bid after three days of steep trail it will prepare for its next humanitarian mission. it is hard to believe, especially those on the canton dock, that she is not coming back. the sequestration situation in the sea could hamper comfort's efforts. if those go through it is possible its latest humanitarian mission could be canceled. let us hope not. wbal, tv 11 news. >> now to some breaking news in the 11 newsroom. fire crews are on the scene of john hopkins facility. several people are being treated. captain roy, what c
disaster. in january of 2010, comfort was deployed to haiti after a 7.0 magnitude earthquake struck. 850 surgeries' were performed and the ship also serves providing medical care throughout the caribbean. why does it need to leave baltimore? officials say there are a number of reasons. >> closer to the ocean, closer to the nation's and region for the humanitarian support. it is also: kidded with medical treatment personnel. the naval hospital is the medical task force on the ship. it is a cost saving initiative for the navy and the taxpayer. >> comfort will dock in the new home and prepare for the next humanitarian mission. >> we will miss them, a lot of people will become more attached, it is like a family. this was like a home for them here, it is like another thing. >> a wet day all across the state. it is a bit of an icy deck along this late february day where temperatures are above freezing in the baltimore area, avoiding the slippery conditions. rain is substantial, coming up in the lower eastern shore of maryland. light rain showers along baltimore and in western maryland, the pin
... that helped out... so many in haiti.../ pf... sea-quest. questtation..t's up to to sse if thh "u-s-n-s comfort" willlreach those in need in south aaerica.but as joelld. smith shows us... what we do know now... is thh ship we do know non't be ccming back home port of baltiiore. baltimore. 7:00 am - time for the united staaes naval ship, the &pcoofort, to leavee he piernat &pbut it's aaslow process to ge 1000 bedssand 900 feet f ship progress on passing a budggt. and that indecision eans we don't know where his ship official direction, the no - mission i undee ponssdeeationn but we are ready. the mission isscalled continuing prrmmse--- a trip to 8 countries... with 3 objectives at each sstp.833 . surgical liff changing procedurrs, trrattng pattents on shore, aa well as medical &pcollaaoratgions... wwth partners, helping ttose in &pneee. comfort's most well pnownntrip was tt haiii, affer theeearttquake in 2010. doctors treaaed more than 800 pattenns before eventuallyy coming back ttohome port in paltimore. 1114 this pier here in cannon is starting to feel lonnly now
, but to the international community. >> thank you. another hand? >> [inaudible] my experience with the haiti response. in this casey i was working at the deputy principal committee level and working at the white house. but it was really the first opportunity for this administration to work with a very complex response, and then recognizing for us the supported commander was usaid that normally isn't in the emergency response business. so, it was an educational process of how to move forces and yet support usaid and the role of the country team and port au prince. so, it was very informative there. and to back up when we had the first no fooling hurricane that worked its way up the entire gulf coast, the principal committee calls that were generated during the haiti response were then turned around and then bringing all of the governors into a conference call with the president to make sure that all their needs were being met in the advance of a hurricane arrival. so, we really had all of government, from local all the way up to the white house, fully included in that response.
coast, the principal committee calls that were generated during the haiti response were then turned around and then bringing all of the governors into a conference call with the president to make sure that all their needs were being met in the advance of a hurricane arrival. so, we really had all of government, from local all the way up to the white house, fully included in that response. but the haiti response was certainly informative in bringing all these disparate entities together to provide unity of effort during a response. >> we need general spiese. >> okay, thanks. i would offer a little bit from an institutional perspective at the tactical level in the marine corps. that's an area where we could use some improvement. our forces deployed to the western pacific certainly understand this, and they pass it on among themselves. the forces we deploy from southern california and the east coast that float into theater understand disaster assistance and humantarian response very well. that hasn't quite migrated itself into the institutional arena in terms of forces stationed here i
formally recommend jkt claims for compensation of thousands of victims from a cool air outbreak in haiti much the island had been free of the disease for decades before the outbreak began in 2011. scientists have traced the source of the cholera to a u.n. peacekeeping base and a leaking sewage pipe. the government of venezuela says president hugo chavez is still suffering breathing problems more than two months after his latest round of cancer surgery. mr. chavez is being treated as a military hospital in caracas after returning from a clinic in cuba earlier this week. he's said to have suffered from a severe respiratory infection after his operation. palestinian protesters are gathering for a second day outside a prison just close to the town of ramallah, where four inmates are staging a hunger strike. on thursday, more than 60 people were injured in clashes with the israeli security forces, according to the red crescent. tear gas and rubber bullets were fired. there are also some reports of live fire being used. the bbc's john done he son joins us outside from the west bank. it does lo
sight. p3 phe hospital ship that helped so many in haiti could be a casualty of sequestrrtioo. 3 joel d. smith is live in --3 pcnton where the u-s-n-s comfort is goiig baac o forrhhw long. good morninn joel d. d. 33 &p3 3 & 33 3 3 3 3 coming up... winner....in our "freebruary" connss.catherrne bezold... you have about 11 inutes left to - call... to claii your prize. prize.the jaakpot is now up to phonn and call the numbbr on your ssreen... ,3 p10-481-4545. 3 3&pyou're watchiig fox 45 morning - news.. all local.. ll morring. - 3 ((bbeak 5)) 3 ((bump in)) -3&p3 ((ad libbmeteorologiit)) 3 3 3 3 3 3 33 3 - 3 & 3 &p 3 3 3 3- 3 & poming up next... 33 yourrspouse may soon get duuped... rom our insurance. & pwhh more and more companness are choosing to droo -3&pspouses... from tteir plans. 3&pand new at 7... a popular dog -3 food is beiig ulled off 3&pbehind thh recall... and the prand it effects.you're 3 all local.. all morning. 3 ((brrak 6)) ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ no two people have the same financial goals. pnc works with you to understand yours and
with the award winning writer on her latest book about haiti. that is next time. and we will see you then. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is right thing. by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can >> and by contributions to your you. thank you. you. thank you.
well. i love you awful these people. i know sean penn you're doing great things down in haiti and hello, does the fire, house is on nir america. where are you? we need you. >> what a privilege for students today. >> oh, my goodness. >> the price of gasoline is taking on a percentage of budgets these days. >> it's amazing how much money we spend on energy. americans spend on average $2900 per year. that is almost 4% of our pretax income. today's news is a bit strus traitd since using less gasoline in 2012. higher gas prices outweig]b= savings throughout those reduced consumption methods. a second report from union of concerned scientists found they'll spend as much on gas as the cost of the vehicle. motorists who purchase a electric vehicle could get a tax brake under a measure introduced today. it would provide exemptions for those who buy electric cars s sales of the vehicles have been slower due to their higher costs but assembly man hopes to offer these incentives. the state supreme court ruling today that it's okay for retailers to ask you for personal information which you buy some
newspapers of distinction. wikileaks released documents around the world to newspapers in india, haiti, the middle east, latin america. it has had an impact in countries we do not know enough about. we're doing a project with six editors in latin america to look at how wikileaks has played a role in their politics. >> the media got distracted by the personality issues with julian assange. it is a fascinating, dark, twisted story, whatever is true. " people got obsessed with it. >> that is what happens. >> we have a cover story on the kim kardashian wedding now. [laughter] >> you have to pay the bills. the serious side of kim kardashian. >> i do think it is a problem. we are undertaking a project next year, the kind of project inspired by the works project to have the team across the country of writers, artists, documentarians, photographers to document poverty in this country. it is the 40th anniversary of the book "the other america." we have this human-resources, people who want to do the project. they can do it in a way to tell the human stories. human stories are key. we can use th
lower than spain or greece. italy's problem is a lack of growth on par with haiti and zimbabwe. that is the problem with its growing. it just evaporate any chance at it being able to repay the huge debt which stands at about 120% of gdp. that is why the eurozone is looking at italy quite closely. the answer so far seems to be austerity. that is what mario monti's government has been pushing. like and other country, greece and spain have huge question marks on whether austerity is the best or worst thing for the economy? it means the economy does not grow. that is one of the issues of anyone at the voting booth today or tomorrow. >> thank you. staying in rome, pope benedict the 16th has been reassuring ball worse that he is not abandoning the roman catholic church. he was giving his final sunday blessing to a packed crowd. paul brennan has the story. >> it lasted barely 10 minutes. his last ever blessing in rome was laden with significant. to an audience of tens of thousands and a global television audience of millions, the pope offered reassurance. if the lord calls me to go up
for that very reason. >> that scene is almost haiti is, entertainment director does all the announcements and everything. that was pretty spot on. >> bet they were struggling. i heard they had performers continue to entertain. >> i want to hear from the person in charge of entertainment. >> i'm veronica de la cruz. this is "early today," just your first stop of the day on your nbc station. >>> a famously adored bear has been immortalized in berlin two years after his sudden death. knut drawing crowds again. the 4-year-old cub made famous when his mother rejected him was made into a new model, using his own fur and claws. he was unveiled at the natural history museum to a group of his adoring fans. >> one food fight in chile isn't just fun for the kids. the tomato war brought participants to one town. participants hurled tomato at each other to relieve stress between family and friends. some wore protective goggles. most just enjoyed playing in the saucy mess. we should try that right here on the set. to relieve stress, of course. right? >> of course. >>> peace and quiet isn't on the progr
at pbs.org. join me next time for a conversation always the author on her latest book about haiti. that is next time. we will see you then. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> be more. pbs. tavis: hi, i'm tavis smiley.
for covering up sandusky's crimes. they will be talking with haiti court right here tomorrow. -- katie couric right here tomorrow. >> the tornado again -- there was significant damage. there have been no reports of death. we are being told the debris is making it hard for crews to check on everyone. >> the weather in other parts of the country, it looks like we are pretty fortunate here. >> students at the university were on mardi gras break. we have 1.5 inches of snow so far at reagan national airport. growing concern we may be looking at the potential for more to add to that later on this week. we will talk about that in just a minute. and outside now, temperatures not so. 39 degrees at 11:00 at night. highs today made it up to 46 degrees. our average for this time of year is also at 46. the record was 68 back in 1960. bristolw, virginia, 36 degrees after a high of 45. 34 degrees at lafayette elementary school in the district. as we move through the early morning hours and into 11:00 12:00, temperatures across the board are well above freezing. colder air just off to the north and east, a f
, costa rica se mide con haiti y nicaragua frente a cuba. el atleta oscar pistorius comparecio por segundo dia consecutivo y ahora con otras novedades en su contra. la policia de pretoria revelo que cajas de testosterona y jeringuillas fueron halladas en la casa del atleta sudafricano oscar pistorius tras el tiroteo que acabÓ con la vida de su novia, reeva steenkamp, crimen del que esta Á acusado el corredor. el agente hilton bortha, fue llamado a testificar por la fiscalÍa, sobre la citada hormona fue contestada por el abogado de pistorius, barry roux, quien asegurÓ que se trata de una medicina herbaria que no estÁ prohibida y que el velocista puede tomar. mientras tanto el fiscal, gerrie nel, presentÓ sus alegatos para oponerse a la libertad del velocista y, anteriormente, revelÓ la existencia del testigo que dice haber escuchado una acalorada discusiÓn en la casa del atleta antes de la muerte de su novia. el atleta tambiÉn se negÓ la acusaciÓn de "asesinato premeditado". hasta aqui los deportes, tendremos mas esta noche solo a las once. ..en unos momentos...detalles de las no
the earthquake in hatey. >> -- haiti. >> thanks for what you're doing in haiti and for us. >> baltimore takes pride in and all also the ship takes pride in it. i think it's a good relationship between the navy and also baltimore. >> reporter: the reason it's ending is financial. >> the navy will save about $2 million a year by putting the ship in norfolk. >> reporter: it will also put it closer to most of the medical staff who are also in virginia. but the navy's savings is baltimore's loss. >> it's bad for our economy. we need them back here. more ships here, more money brings into our ports. >> reporter: today, there was no time to visit aboard. only a especially crew is taking the comfort out for sea trials first. then home to norfolk. but those aboard lined the rail and waved. >> biez, baltimore -- bye, baltimore. we love you. >> reporter: the feeling is mutual. >> it's emotional. >> they're family. >> they're not coming back. >> later this sprirntion the comfort will visit the ports and provide medical care to those who can least afford it.
in haiti. >> thank you guys for what you're doing for haiti and for old us. >> reporter: these have always been a source of pride for baltimore. >> baltimore takes pride in it. and the ship takes pride in it. i think it's a good relationship between the navy and baltimore. >> reporter: the reason it's ending is financial. >> maybe we'll save about $2 million per year by putting the ship in norfolk. >> reporter: it will also put it closer to most of the medical staff who are also in virginia. but the navy's savings is baltimore's loss. >> it's bad for our economy. we need them back here. more ships here, the more money it brings into our ports. >> reporter: today, there was no time to visit aboard. only a partial crew taken out for sea trials first. then home to norfolk. but those aboard lined the rail and waved. >> bye, baltimore. we love you. >> the feeling is mutual. >> it's emotional. >> it's family. >> not coming back. >> reporter: alex demetrick, wjz eyewitness news. >> later this spring, the comfort will visit ports in south america on a
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